How to Drain Your Water Heater: A Step-by-Step Guide

Tank water heaters are a reliable way to secure a fast supply of hot water for your home. The addition of a storage tank ensures some hot water is readily available. But over time, foreign substances can accumulate in the storage tank. This could be sediment or mineral buildup originating from the main water line or an opening in the pipes. Whatever the culprit is, this buildup can negatively impact the efficiency of water heaters. In severe cases it can plug up drainage and may even cause premature failure.

Fortunately, draining your water heater and clearing out sediment buildup is a relatively simple task. An experienced plumber in Jacksonville can handle the process, but you can also drain the tank on your own if you know what you’re doing. Either way, draining the tank now can help lower the risk you’ll need premature water heater replacement.

Before You Begin…

Before you start draining the tank, you should shut off the cold water supply. The supply valve connects your water heater with the main water line. Unless you have access to a well (and you might need to drain the tank more often if you do), the water main supplies all the potable water your home uses. Keeping the valve sealed will stop more water from reaching the tank, allowing you to completely empty it.

You’ll also want to get a rubber hose, like one you would use for yard work. The hose allows you to safely drain the water heater tank without spilling water in your garage, utility closet, attic or wherever the water heater is kept. Make sure you put the other end of the hose far away from your home to keep the water from seeping back inside.

Finally, a screwdriver should help you loosen tight screws or valves. You shouldn’t need any more tools than this unless you stumble upon a problem with the water heater or nearby piping. At that point, it may be best to hire a certified plumber in Jacksonville.

Step 1: Shut Off the Water Heater

After you’ve shut off the water supply, you can shut off the water heater itself. This should be on the thermostat for natural gas water heaters or via a breaker switch for electric models. The pilot setting on gas water heaters can remain on during flushing, but electric models must be completely off. This is because of the heating elements electric water heaters have, which remain submerged. In an empty tank, they can quickly overheat. You should also review the model’s manual, as some water heaters need to be completely full before the heating elements are started.

Even after you’ve shut off the water heater, you’ll need to wait for the water stored in the tank to cool down. It may be hours before the water reaches a safe temperature, so it is usually best to leave the rest of the process for the following day.

Step 2: Attach the Hose to the Water Heater’s Drain Valve

Tank water heaters are designed with a drain valve you can use to empty the storage tank. Once you’re sure the water supply is disconnected and the water heater itself is off, go ahead and find the drain valve. Some models might have it covered up. Make sure the hose is firmly attached to prevent spilling hot water near you and the water heater.

Step 3: Open a Faucet or Other Hot Water Tap

Your home’s plumbing takes advantage of pressure within the piping to maintain a consistent flow of water from the main water line to the rest of the house. This pressure needs to be relieved before the hot water can actually flow from the tank. By heading to the nearest faucet or spigot, you’ll release the pressure inside the piping. All you have to do is open the hot water tap to relieve the pressure before heading back to the water heater.

Step 4: Release the Drain Valve

Don’t forget that this water could still have some residual heat. Open the drain valve and allow all the water to drain from the tank. This should carry sediment buildup out of the tank and away from your home. But some buildup may be stuck to the inside of the tank. Turning the cold water supply back on will help flush stubborn minerals and other substances from the tank.

Repeat this step until the water appears clear of sediment or minerals. If the drain isn’t working because of a clog, a trained plumber may be required.

Step 5: Re-Shut the Valve Before Refilling the Water Heater

If everything proceeds like it’s supposed to, you should be able to remove most excess sediment hiding inside your water heater. Seal up the drain valve, disconnect the hose and open the water supply to get things working again. As the water heater tank begins to fill, head back to the hot water tap you opened. Once cold water starts to flow, you know the pressure is back at appropriate levels.

At this point, you can open the gas valve or flip the breaker switch back on. Like we mentioned before, don’t forget that some models may need to be entirely full before the water can be safely heated. Make sure you review your manufacturer’s instructions before starting the process.

Keep Your Water Heater Sediment-Free for Best Results

Tank water heaters are still a great option for supplying your hot water needs. Draining the tank every 1-2 years will help clear out sediment buildup and keep things running at peak efficiency. If you think your water heater is past the point of efficient heating, consider looking for water heater replacement in Jacksonville from a technician you trust.